Monday, November 30, 2015

Can You Go Home Again?



When I was growing up—and when my children were young—holidays were celebrated one at a time. What a unique concept that would be today!
Only after celebrating the last summer holiday, Labor Day, with family get-togethers, picnics, boating and other activities, did we begin thinking of the next special day – Halloween.
Most people loved Halloween, especially children. It was enjoyed thoroughly and we didn’t even consider the next holiday until this one was over. Thanksgiving, one of the most important days of the year, finally arrived! It was anticipated with excitement by almost everyone. It was a day of giving thanks for our many blessings, and, for most families, it meant a huge feast, football and unforgettable family gatherings.
Then came the big one! The major celebration of the year! The cherry on the sundae...
Christmas!
Believe it or not, part of the beauty of each of those holidays was anticipation. One by one, we savored them – sucked as much enjoyment out of each as possible before going on to the next.
If you sometimes say to yourself, “Holidays aren’t what they used to be.” You're right. When they all run together from the Fourth of July through Christmas, something is lost to be sure.
C’mon, admit it. You’ve been seeing Christmas decorations in stores since early September, haven’t you? About the same time they put Halloween paraphernalia on the shelves, they go ahead and add Christmas items, too. Makes it easier, I suppose.
Everyone I talk to says, “Oh, my! the time goes so fast! It’s just whizzes by!”
Well, of course, it does! We measure time by holidays. Before one is over, we’re already into the next, and the next, and on and on.... Practically everyone I know had their Christmas tree up either before Thanksgiving or the day after. When I was a child, Thanksgiving weekend ushered in the Christmas season. There was no big rush. It was the ultimate “savoring” season.
Ahhh, to experience that feeling just one more time!
Thomas Wolfe wrote the words, You Can’t Go Home Again, but that doesn’t make me long for the past any less. 
Common sense tells me it’s not possible and that I must let go of the past, live in the present and look forward to the future.
But, unfortunately for me, “The mind can't delete what the heart won't let go of!”   
 

6 comments:

Darlene said...

It's been an age old question. Nobody is sure whether you can go home again or not.
Great post, Peggy!

Linda said...

Love it Peggy! Great writing, as always.

Tim said...

Love your last line Peggy. 'The mind can't delete....' Nice!

Anonymous said...

This is great! I agree with you. Everything is too rushed these days. Takes the fun out of it. You tell em, Peg!

Drema said...

Yes Peggy, holidays are all jammed into one. When we were kids Easter was so enjoyable, grandma would make us new dresses and the boys new shirts and pants, mom somehow managed to buy new shoes and some thing from the Easter bunny, then came the 4th of July oh what a time it was, watermelon, home made ice cream and seeing extended family, cousins, aunts and uncles. Labor day week end was celebrated by going to the state fair, which was where Shawnee Park is now, and that Saturday was really cheap for kids to get in the fair so much fun. Then Halloween, we didn't have costumes, we would take an old pair of stockings and pull over our heads and faces, we could breath and see through them, and go walking for a mile to houses and trick and treat, we would get apples or popcorn balls and yes we got into some mischief at times. Thanksgiving was hog slaughtering time the men would do the killing, hanging, gutting and scraping of them and the women would cook up a big meal of ham and vegetables for lunch while we kids played. Christmas was really anticipated we children truly believed in Santa and again some how mom always made sure we had gifts from Santa Claus, even if grandma made new dresses to put on our old dolls and dad painted old cars and trucks for the boys, but the best part was the Christmas Play that we took part in. Our kids and grand kids will never get to experience those times and that is sad.

Peggy~ said...

Thanks for that, Drema! Your comment is better than my post! You wrote about the kinds of things I remember from my childhood, too. Times were hard, but it didn't matter. Families helped each other and there was lots of love among family members. Everyone is too busy these days, it seems. I guess that's why they rush holidays so much - so they can get back to their busy lives.
You're right. Today's kids miss out on a lot of the joys we knew as kids.
And I feel sorry for them!